By Irene Aldridge Twenty years ago, television told women to buy extraordinary quantities of shoes. There was the holy grail of happiness, according to the absolute hit “Sex in the City”. For today’s generation of women “Sex and the City” is out, and a new trend is in, marching in protest. The marching is against the dominant male stereotype, but also explicitly asking for the government (another patriarchal authority?) to provide certain services, higher wages, better working conditions, and the like. How about taking charge of our own future in a constructive meaningful way? An interesting study is the Big Data Finance conference at NewRead More →

The new revelations surrounding the Flash Crash of May 6, 2010, once again brought to light an undeniable fact: U.S. regulators desperately need to boost their real-time surveillance capabilities. Nearly five years has elapsed between the time the London-based Navinder Singh Sarao, allegedly influenced the Flash Crash and the government identification of this event! Gone are the days when market issues could be analyzed by a team watching for on-screen images of market events. Regulatory agencies are ill-equipped to handle real-time issues in a timely manner. However, market solutions, such as suite of real-time products are designed to spot market microstructure issues, such asRead More →

Just 10 years ago, finance was a small-data discipline. The small-data approach was partly due to the actual lack of data. To most investors, exchanges offered only four prices per stock per day: Open, High, Low and Close, and all of those were reported the following day (on the T+1 basis). Even the largest market makers did not store intraday data beyond what was mandated by regulators. Commodity trading floors, for instance, had only 21 days of history on hand until approximately five years ago. Finance Ph.D. programs almost exclusively taught analysis of closing prices, mentioning intraday variations only in passing. Today, real-time streaming dataRead More →